Inspirational David Hume Quotes

David Hume (7 May 1711 NS (26 April 1711 OS) – 25 August 1776) was a Scottish philosopher, historian, economist, and essayist. This post features some Inspirational David Hume Quotes.

Hume is best known today for his highly influential system of radical philosophical empiricism, skepticism, and naturalism. Hume’s empiricist approach to philosophy places him with John Locke, George Berkeley, Francis Bacon, and Thomas Hobbes as a British Empiricist. Due to Hume’s vast influence on contemporary philosophy, a large number of approaches in contemporary philosophy and cognitive science are today called “Humean.”

David Hume Quotes
David Hume Quotes

David Hume Quotes

“Beauty is no quality in things themselves: It exists merely in the mind which contemplates them; and each mind perceives a different beauty.”
― David Hume

“The truth springs from arguments amongst friends.”
― David Hume

“Reason is, and ought only to be the slave of the passions.”
― David Hume

“Generally speaking, the errors in religion are dangerous; those in philosophy only ridiculous.”
― David Hume

“Be a philosopher; but, amidst all your philosophy, be still a man.”
― David Hume

“Reading and sauntering and lounging and dosing, which I call thinking, is my supreme Happiness.”
― David Hume

“No man ever threw away life while it was worth keeping.”
David Hume quotes

“A wise man apportions his beliefs to the evidence.”
― David Hume

“He is happy whose circumstances suit his temper, but he is more excellent who can suit his temper to his circumstance.”
― David Hume

“When men are most sure and arrogant they are commonly most mistaken, giving views to passion without that proper deliberation which alone can secure them from the grossest absurdities.”
― David Hume

“Reason is, and ought only to be the slave of the passions, and can never pretend to any other office than to serve and obey them.”
David Hume

“Liberty of any kind is never lost all at once.”
― David Hume

“Does a man of sense run after every silly tale of hobgoblins or fairies, and canvass particularly the evidence? I never knew anyone, that examined and deliberated about nonsense who did not believe it before the end of his enquiries.”
― David Hume

“The identity that we ascribe to things is only a fictitious one, established by the mind, not a peculiar nature belonging to what we’re talking about.”
David Hume quotes

“Epicurus’s old questions are still unanswered: Is he (God) willing to prevent evil, but not able? then he is impotent. Is he able, but not willing? then he is malevolent. Is he both able and willing? then whence evil?”
― David Hume

“In our reasonings concerning matter of fact, there are all imaginable degrees of assurance, from the highest certainty to the lowest species of moral evidence. A wise man, therefore, proportions his belief to the evidence.”
― David Hume

“The bigotry of theologians [is] a malady which seems almost incurable.”
― David Hume

“The sweetest and most inoffensive path of life leads through the avenues of science and learning; and whoever can either remove any obstructions in this way, or open up any new prospect, ought so far to be esteemed a benefactor to mankind.”
― David Hume

“The life of man is of no greater importance to the universe than that of an oyster.”
― David Hume

“It is an absurdity to believe that the Deity has human passions, and one of the lowest of human passions, a restless appetite for applause.”
― David Hume

“Any pride or haughtiness, is displeasing to us, merely because it shocks our own pride, and leads us by sympathy into comparison, which causes the disagreeable passion of humility.”
― David Hume

“If we take in our hand any volume; of divinity or school metaphysics, for instance; let us ask, Does it contain any abstract reasoning concerning quantity or number? No. Does it contain any experimental reasoning concerning matter of fact and existence? No. Commit it then to the flames: for it can contain nothing but sophistry and illusion.”
― David Hume

“To philosopher and historian the madness and imbecile wickedness of mankind ought to appear ordinary events.”
― David Hume

“To be a philosophical Sceptic is the first and most essential step towards being a sound, believing Christian.”
― David Hume

“All sentiment is right; because sentiment has a reference to nothing beyond itself, and is always real, wherever a man is conscious of it. But all determinations of the understanding are not right; because they have a reference to something beyond themselves, to wit, real matter of fact; and are not always conformable to that standard.”
― David Hume

“Men’s views of things are the result of their understanding alone. Their conduct is regulated by their understanding, their temper, and their passions.”
― David Hume

“We make allowance for a certain degree of selfishness in men; because we know it to be inseparable from human nature, and inherent in our frame and constitution. By this reflexion we correct those sentiments of blame, which so naturally arise upon any opposition.”
― David Hume

Inspirational Wilfrid Sellars Quotes

Wilfrid Stalker Sellars (May 20, 1912 – July 2, 1989) was an American philosopher. This post features some Inspirational Wilfrid Sellars Quotes.

Sellars was a prominent developer of critical realism, who “revolutionized both the content and the method of philosophy in the United States.”

Sellars coined certain now-common idioms in philosophy, such as the “space of reasons”. This idiom refers to two things. It:

(1) Describes the conceptual and behavioral web of language that humans use to get intelligently around their world,
Denotes the fact that talk of reasons, epistemic justification, and intention is not the same as, and cannot necessarily be mapped onto, talk of causes and effects in the sense that physical science speaks of them.

(2) corresponds in part to the distinction Sellars makes between the manifest image and the scientific image.

Sellars’ most famous work is the lengthy and difficult paper, “Empiricism and the Philosophy of Mind” (1956). In it, he criticises the view that knowledge of what we perceive can be independent of the conceptual processes which result in perception. He named this “The Myth of the Given,” attributing it to phenomenology and sense-data theories of knowledge.

In his “Philosophy and the Scientific Image of Man” (1962), Sellars distinguishes between the “manifest image” and the “scientific image” of the world.

The manifest image includes intentions, thoughts, and appearances. Sellars allows that the manifest image may be refined through ‘correlational induction’, but he rules out appeal to imperceptible entities.

The scientific image describes the world in terms of the theoretical physical sciences. It includes notions such as causality and theories about particles and forces.

Wilfrid Sellars Quotes
Wilfrid Sellars Quotes

Wilfrid Sellars Quotes

“The aim of philosophy, abstractly formulated, is to understand how things in the broadest possible sense of the term hang together in the broadest possible sense of the term. Under ‘things in the broadest possible sense’ I include such radically different items as not only ‘cabbages and kings’, but numbers and duties, possibilities and finger snaps, aesthetic experience and death. To achieve success in philosophy would be, to use a contemporary turn of phrase, to ‘know one’s way around’ with respect to all these things, not in that unreflective way in which the centipede of the story knew its way around before it faced the question, ‘how do I walk?’, but in that reflective way which means that no intellectual holds are barred.”
― Wilfrid Sellars

“The interpretation of thought as “”inner speech” has taken different forms, and has been used to clarify a variety of problems–thus problems pertaining to the logical forms of thought and the connection of thought with things.”
Wilfrid Sellars quotes

“The categories of intentionality are nothing more nor less than the metalinguistic categories in terms of which we talk epistemically about overt speech as they appear in the framework of thoughts construed on the model of over speech.”
Wilfrid Sellars

“To put the matter in Aristotelian terminology, visual impressions are prior in the order of being to concepts pertaining to physical color, whereas the latter are prior in the order of knowing to concepts pertaining to visual impressions.”
― Wilfrid Sellars

Inspirational John Rawls Quotes

John Rawls (February 21, 1921 – November 24, 2002) was an American moral and political philosopher. This post features some Inspirational John Rawls Quotes.

He held the James Bryant Conant University Professorship at Harvard University and the Fulbright Fellowship at the University of Oxford. Rawls received both the Schock Prize for Logic and Philosophy and the National Humanities Medal in 1999, the latter presented by President Bill Clinton, in recognition of how Rawls’s work “helped a whole generation of learned Americans revive their faith in democracy itself.”

His magnum opus, A Theory of Justice (1971), was said at the time of its publication to be “the most important work in moral philosophy since the end of World War II” and is now regarded as “one of the primary texts in political philosophy”.

John Rawls Quotes
John Rawls Quotes

John Rawls Quotes

“The principles of justice are chosen behind a veil of ignorance.”
― John Rawls

“Justice is happiness according to virtue.”
― John Rawls

“Many of our most serious conflicts are conflicts within ourselves. Those who suppose their judgements are always consistent are unreflective or dogmatic.”
― John Rawls

“I am particularly grateful to Nozick for his unfailing help and encouragement during the last stages.”
― John Rawls

“The concept of justice I take to be defined, then, by the role of its principles in assigning rights and duties and in defining the appropriate division of social advantages. A conception of justice is an interpretation of this role.”
― John Rawls

“An individual who finds that he enjoys seeing others in positions of lesser liberty understands that he has no claim whatever to this enjoyment.”
― John Rawls

“A conception of justice cannot be deduced from self evident premises or conditions on principles; instead, its justification is a matter of the mutual support of many considerations, of everything fitted together into one coherent view.”
John Rawls

“It may be expedient but it is not just that some should have less in order that others may prosper.”
― John Rawls

“Indeed, it is tempting to suppose that it is self evident that things should be so arranged so as to lead to the most good.”
John Rawls quotes

“In all sectors of society there should be roughly equal prospects of culture and achievement for everyone similarly motivated and endowed. The expectations of those with the same abilities and aspirations should not be affected by their social class.”
― John Rawls

“We may suppose that everyone has in himself the whole form of a moral conception.”
― John Rawls

“Greater intelligence, wealth and opportunity, for example, allow a person to achieve ends he could not rationally contemplate otherwise.”
― John Rawls

“The first statement of the two principles reads as follows. First: each person is to have an equal right to the most extensive basic liberty compatible with a similar liberty for others. Second: social and economic inequalities are to be arranged so that they are both(a)reasonably expected to be to everyone’s advantage, and (b) attached to positions and offices open to all.”
― John Rawls

“A just system must generate its own support.”
― John Rawls

“The difference principle, for example, requires that the higher expectations of the more advantaged contribute to the prospects of the least advantaged.”
― John Rawls

“A scheme is unjust when the higher expectations, one or more of them, are excessive. If these expectations were decreased, the situation of the less favored would be improved.”
― John Rawls

“An intuitionist conception of justice is, one might say, but half a conception.”
― John Rawls

“Our concern is solely with the basic structure of society and its major institutions and therefore with the standard cases of social justice.”
John Rawls quotes

“No one deserves his greater natural capacity nor merits a more favorable starting place in society.”
― John Rawls

“To each according to his threat advantage does not count as a principle of justice.”
― John Rawls

“Many conservative writers have contended that the tendency to equality in modern social movements is the expression of envy. In this way they seek to discredit this trend, attributing it to collectively harmful impulses.”
― John Rawls

“Ideal legislators do not vote their interests.”
― John Rawls

“The even larger difference between rich and poor makes the latter even worse off, and this violates the principle of mutual advantage.”
― John Rawls

“The extreme nature of dominant-end views is often concealed by the vagueness and ambiguity of the end proposed.”
― John Rawls

“If A were not allowed his better position, B would be even worse off than he is.”
― John Rawls

“The intolerant can be viewed as free-riders, as persons who seek the advantages of just institutions while not doing their share to uphold them.”
― John Rawls

“I have tried to set forth a theory that enables us to understand and to assess these feelings about the primacy of justice. Justice as fairness is the outcome: it articulates these opinions and supports their general tendency.”
― John Rawls

“Men resign themselves to their position should it ever occur to them to question it; and since all may view themselves as assigned their vocation, everyone is held to be equally fated and equally noble in the eyes of providence.”
― John Rawls

“There is a divergence between private and social accounting that the market fails to register. One essential task of law and government is to institute the necessary conditions.”
John Rawls quotes

“Justice is the first virtue of social institutions, as truth is of systems of thought. A theory however elegant and economical must be rejected or revised if it is untrue; likewise laws and institutions no matter how efficient and well-arranged must be reformed or abolished if they are unjust. Each person possesses an inviolability founded on justice that even the welfare of society as a whole cannot override. For this reason justice denies that the loss of freedom for some is made right by a greater good shared by others. It does not allow that the sacrifices imposed on a few are outweighed by the larger sum of advantages enjoyed by many. Therefore in a just society the liberties of equal citizenship are taken as settled; the rights secured by justice are not subject to political bargaining or to the calculus of social interests.”
― John Rawls