Inspirational G.E. Moore Quotes

George Edward “G. E.” Moore (4 November 1873 – 24 October 1958) was an English philosopher. This post features some Inspirational G.E. Moore Quotes.

He was, with Bertrand Russell, Ludwig Wittgenstein, and (before them) Gottlob Frege, one of the founders of the analytic tradition in philosophy. Along with Russell, he led the turn away from idealism in British philosophy, and became well known for his advocacy of common sense concepts, his contributions to ethics, epistemology, and metaphysics, and “his exceptional personality and moral character.”

He was elected a fellow of the British Academy in 1918. He was a member of the Cambridge Apostles, the intellectual secret society, from 1894 to 1901, and the Cambridge University Moral Sciences Club.

G.E. Moore Quotes
G.E. Moore Quotes

G.E. Moore Quotes

“The hours I spend with you I look upon as sort of a perfumed garden, a dim twilight, and a fountain singing to it. You and you alone make me feel that I am alive. Other men it is said have seen angels, but I have seen thee and thou art enough.”
― G.E. Moore

“If i am asked ‘what is good? my answer is that good is good, and that is the end of the matter. Or if I am asked ‘How is good to be defined?’ my answer is that it cannot be defined, and that is all I have to say about it.”
― G.E. Moore quotes

“A great artist is always before his time or behind it.”
― G.E. Moore

“Fiction is as useful as truth, for giving us matter, upon which to exercise the judgment of value.”
― G.E. Moore

“Moral conduct,or duty,is defined as the obligation to select that action which will achieve more good than any alternative action.”
― G.E. Moore

“Philosophical questions are so difficult, the problems they raise are so complex, that no one can fairly expect, now, any more than in the past, to win more than a very limited assent.”
― G.E. Moore

“Good, then, is indefinable.”
― G.E. Moore

“It was pointed out that by “natural” there might here be meant either “normal” or “necessary”, and that neither the “normal” nor the “necessary” could be seriously supposed to be either always good or the only good things.”
G.E. Moore

“If indeed good were a feeling….then it would exist in time. But that is why to call it so is to commit the naturalistic fallacy. It will always remain pertinent to ask, whether the feeling itself is good; and if do, then good cannot itself be identical with any feeling.”
― G.E. Moore

“If good is defined as something else, it is then impossible either to prove that any other definition is wrong or even to deny such definition.”
― G.E. Moore

“Egoism holds, therefore, is that each man’s happiness is the sole good–that a number of different things are each of them the only good thing there is–an absolute contradiction! No more complete and thorough refutation of any theory could be desired.”
― G.E. Moore

“For it is the business of Ethics, I must insist, not only to obtain true results, but also to find valid reasons for them.”
― G.E. Moore

“We must not, therefore, be frightened by the assertion that a thing is natural into the admission that it is good; good does not, by definition, mean anything that is natural; and it is therefore always an open question whether anything that is natural is good.”
― G.E. Moore

“Was the excellence of Socrates or of Shakespeare normal? Was it not rather abnormal, extraordinary? It is, I think, obvious in the first place, that not all that is good is normal; that, on the contrary, the abnormal is often better than the normal.”
― G.E. Moore

“It seems to me that a pleasurable Contemplation of Beauty has certainly an immeasurably greater value than mere Consciousness of Pleasure.”
G.E. Moore quotes

“By far the most valuable things, which we know or can imagine, are certain states of consciousness, which may roughly be described as the pleasures of human intercourse and the enjoyment of beautiful objects. No one, probably, who has asked himself the question, has ever doubted that personal affection and the appreciation of what is beautiful in Art or Nature, are good in themselves; nor, if we consider strictly what things are worth having purely for their own sakes, does it appear probable that any one will think that anything else has nearly so much value as the things which are included under these two heads.”
― G.E. Moore

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